Foundation Celebrates 66 Years of Preserving Charleston

5/1/2013

CHARLESTON, S.C. (May 1, 2013) --- Historic Charleston Foundation, a nonprofit organization with a mission to preserve and protect the integrity of Charleston's architectural, historical, and cultural heritage, celebrated the 66th anniversary of its founding yesterday.  On Charter Day, the Foundation traditionally recognizes organizations and individuals who have made contributions in protecting Charleston’s irreplaceable historic buildings, neighborhoods, and other special sites.

“The Foundation appreciates the generosity of all those who work with us day in and day out and Charter Day affords us the opportunity to honor our past and look forward to the future with resolve and optimism,” said Kitty Robinson, president and CEO of Historic Charleston Foundation. “We are most delighted to work with and honor these talented and generous, preservation-minded advocates who share our mission.”

The following awards were presented during the Charter Day ceremony yesterday evening:

The Samuel Gaillard Stoney Conservation Craftsmanship Award was created to recognize craftspeople who have kept alive the tradition of excellence in the building trades for which Charleston is renowned.

  • Hoyt Roberts—A native of S.C., Roberts has worked for Richard Marks Restorations Inc. as a carpenter and as a project manager since 1990.  With a specialty in the detail-oriented world of carpentry, Hoyt is modest and easy going yet he also has a take-charge demeanor when it comes to project management. His work at the Old Powder Magazine when the Foundation leased the property and allocated $400,000 to ensure its proper restoration was of highest quality as he collaborated with other professionals to restore one of the oldest structures in the Carolinas. Roberts has also worked extensively on the Foundation’s Aiken-Rhett House. Most recently, Roberts oversaw and implemented the rehabilitation on Medway Plantation in Berkeley County, the oldest masonry plantation house in S.C.
     
  • Geno Kollar—His repair and restoration of locks and hardware in Charleston began in 1997 on projects such as Lowndes Grove, the Sword Gate House, and the Gaillard-Bennett House for a total of over 40 historic buildings on the Charleston Peninsula and several plantations and churches in the surrounding Lowcountry.  Frequently called the “locksmith for the stars,” Kollar has worked on the houses of celebrities including Doris Day and Oprah Winfrey. He learned locksmithing the old-fashioned way where training is on-going, where instead of replacing an antique lock with a modern lock; it is refurbished and complimented with era-appropriate parts that return the door to its original look. 


The Robert N.S. and Patti Foos Whitelaw Award was established to recognize citizens whose work embodies the spirit of achievement and high expectations that were the highlight of the Whitelaws’ efforts to preserve Charleston’s streetscapes, neighborhoods, and public buildings from the 1940s through the 1970s.

  • Kevin Eberle—Eberle began practicing law in 1995 and moved to the Hampton Park Terrace neighborhood in early 1996. He became active in the preservation community and later combined his love for the neighborhood and Charleston’s history when he authored a definitive guide to the history of Charleston’s Hampton Park in 2012. He has been an effective watchdog for his own neighborhood of Hampton Park Terrace and for the larger Upper Peninsula with regard to building preservation and zoning.  Since these areas do not currently have the level of design review and demolition protections that are in place in the Lower Peninsula, Kevin has worked one-on-one with his neighbors to educate them about the benefits of preservation, giving recommendations on craftsmen and other resources. 
     
  • Dr. Nicholas Butler—Butler worked as archivist of the S.C. Historical Society, as an adjunct faculty member at the College of Charleston, and as an historical consultant for the City of Charleston on research projects such as the City Market, White Point Garden and Colonial Lake. Since 2005 he has been the archivist and public historian for the Charleston County Public Library. Butler has also worked as the historian for the collaborative effort that is the Mayor’s Walled City Task Force, combing through literally thousands of historical documents so that we may better understand the early fortifications and thus better understand the origins of our city. His research has underpinned the Task Force’s archaeological investigations and has brought about a host of new discoveries.
     
  • Sarah Fick—Fick’s efforts as a preservation consultant, author and consummate research professional have all combined to create a lasting legacy of scholarship. She came to Charleston in 1983 and began working in historic preservation, preparing historic and architectural surveys, researching historic properties, creating house histories and drafting nominations to the National Register of Historic Places.  Her National Register work includes properties such as Friendfield Plantation and the Hampton Park Terrace National Register District, to name only a couple. Fick has, for years, worked directly with the Foundation by completing research for our easement property donations and has also been a tour guide and volunteer with the Festival of Houses and Gardens. 
     
  • Harlan Greene—Greene has authored, edited, contributed to and reviewed numerous books and articles since 1976 and has set the bar for those researching and writing about Charleston and the Lowcountry.  Greene is currently the senior manuscript and reference archivist for Special Collections for the College of Charleston Libraries, and was formerly Director of Archival and Reference Services at the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture. He founded and directed special collections at the Charleston County Public Library (Charleston Archive) where he facilitated the transfer of early City of Charleston records to the County Library.
     
  • Charleston Country Parks and Recreation Commission (CCPRC) and Tom O’Rourke—CCPRC owns just over 10,000 acres with approximately half of that acquired in the last eight years since the inception of the County’s Greenbelt Program which is funded through the Half-Cent Sales Tax.  CCPRC has leveraged this program with funds from a variety other sources, both public and private, to purchase 15 new properties, creating new park sites and expanding existing ones. 

Most important, the Commission, under the leadership of Director Tom O’Rourke, used a measured and thoughtful approach, ensuring that the new facilities are accessible to all residents, and ensuring that historic, natural, and culturally significant places are safeguarded.  Under O’Rourke’s direction, the CCPRC has also been nationally recognized as a visionary steward of the Lowcountry’s natural and cultural resources. The CCPRC’s efforts to protect special places like McLeod and Ashem Plantations are creating a lasting legacy in Charleston.

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Established in 1947, Historic Charleston Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to preserve and protect the historical, architectural and material culture that make up Charleston's rich and irreplaceable heritage. More>

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Historic Charleston Foundation
40 East Bay Street
Charleston, SC 29401
843-723-1623


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